Lines and The City

When faced with the challenge of "finding and bringing 20 lines from the city", students from the Spatial Studies 2 (Urban Interventions) class did not know these lines would become the alphabet for their first project: The development of a expanded drawing using only the elements available in their findings. 

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Daniela Torres - Smash, 2015.   Daniela first brought 20 broken smartphones found at electronic junkyards. After working on her idea, she abstarcted a series of drawings on tracing paper, creating a booklet that speaks clearly about fragility, consumerism and obsolence in the mobile era. 

Daniela Torres - Smash, 2015.   Daniela first brought 20 broken smartphones found at electronic junkyards. After working on her idea, she abstarcted a series of drawings on tracing paper, creating a booklet that speaks clearly about fragility, consumerism and obsolence in the mobile era. 

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Daniela Saenz - Dirty Laundry, 2015. Daniela found a special quality in the public display of clotheslines in popular, low-income neighborhoods in Bogotà. She then staged a series of photographs/interventions in front of historical landmarks of the city, inserting this well-known urban trademark into the touristic landscape and giving a new meaning to the popular saying "dirty laundry". 

Daniela Saenz - Dirty Laundry, 2015. Daniela found a special quality in the public display of clotheslines in popular, low-income neighborhoods in Bogotà. She then staged a series of photographs/interventions in front of historical landmarks of the city, inserting this well-known urban trademark into the touristic landscape and giving a new meaning to the popular saying "dirty laundry". 

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Juliana Galvis - Virrey, Tadeo, Carabelas, 2015. Juliana developed a human cartography based on her journeys across the three different neighborhoods she frequents the most. For her, these linear paths are defined by the people who demark the territory: fruit vendors, locals at coffee shops etc. She devoleped a series of trading cards presenting portrait photographs, where the subjects are removed from the context, and a cartographic drawing of their location on the back of the card. She also created an installation suggesting the crossing of her journeys, connecting the cards using threads and presenting this as personal maps of her own experience in the city. 

Juliana Galvis - Virrey, Tadeo, Carabelas, 2015. Juliana developed a human cartography based on her journeys across the three different neighborhoods she frequents the most. For her, these linear paths are defined by the people who demark the territory: fruit vendors, locals at coffee shops etc. She devoleped a series of trading cards presenting portrait photographs, where the subjects are removed from the context, and a cartographic drawing of their location on the back of the card. She also created an installation suggesting the crossing of her journeys, connecting the cards using threads and presenting this as personal maps of her own experience in the city.